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Produce Talk


MARCH 23, 2017
Volume 28, Issue 12



ITEM OF THE WEEK:  PEARS


What's New and Beneficial About Pears 

  • For nutritional reasons, we're often advised to consume the skins of fruits. However, it's less often that research provides strong evidence in support of this advice. Recent studies have shown that the skin of pears contains at least three to four times as many phenolic phytonutrients as the flesh. These phytonutrients include antioxidant, anti-inflammatory flavonoids, and potentially anti-cancer phytonutrients like cinnamic acids. The skin of the pear has also been show to contain about half of the pear's total dietary fiber.
  • In recent studies measuring risk of type 2 diabetes in U.S. women, pears have earned very special recognition. Researchers now know that certain flavonoids in food can improve insulin sensitivity, and of special interest in this area have been three groups of flavonoids (flavonols, flavan-3-ols, and anthocyanins). All pears contain flavonoids falling within the first two groups, and red-skinned pears contain anthocyanins as well. Intake of these flavonoid groups has been associated with decreased risk of type 2 diabetes in both women and men. However, a new analysis of the Nurses' Health Study has shown that among all fruits and vegetables analyzed for their flavonoid content, the combination of apples/pears showed the most consistent ability to lower risk of type 2 diabetes. We believe that this special recognition given to pears as a fruit that can help lower risk of type 2 diabetes in women is likely to be followed by future studies showing this same benefit for men.
  • You've no doubt heard someone say that cloudy fruit juices containing fruit pulp provide better nourishment than clear fruit juices that have had their pulp removed through filtering. Scientists have now proven that statement to be correct with respect to pear juice. With their pulp removed, pear juices were determined to lose up to 40% of their total phenolic phytonutrients, and to have significantly reduced antioxidant capacity. "Cloudy" pear juices (technically referred to as "high turbidity" juices) emerged as the superior juice type in terms of nutrient content as well as antioxidant benefits.     

Health Benefits
 
  • Pears fruit is packed with health benefiting nutrients such as dietary fiber, antioxidants, minerals, and vitamins, which are necessary for optimum health. Total measured antioxidant strength (ORAC value) in pears is 2941 TE/100 g.

  • Pears are a good source of dietary fiber. 100 g fruit provides 3.1 g or 8% of fiber per 100 g.  Regular eating of this fruit may offer protection against colon cancer. Most of the fiber in them is a non-soluble polysaccharide (NSP), which functions as a good bulk laxative in the gut. Additionally, its gritty fiber content binds to cancer-causing toxins and chemicals in the colon, protecting its mucous membrane from contact with these compounds.

  • Also, pear fruit is one of the very low-calorie fruits; provides just 58 calories per 100g. A low calorie but high fiber diet may help bring significant reduction in body weight, and blood LDL cholesterol levels.

  • They contain good quantities of vitamin-C. Fresh fruits provide about 7% of RDA per 100 g of this vitamin.

  • They are a modest sources of antioxidant flavonoid phytonutrients such as β-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin. These compounds, along with vitamin C and A, help the body protected from harmful free radicals. 

  • The fruit is a good source of minerals such as copper, iron, potassium, manganese and magnesium as well as B-complex vitamins such as folates, riboflavin and pyridoxine (vitamin B-6). 

  • Although not well documented, pears are among the least allergenic of all the fruits. For the same reason, they often recommended by health practitioners as a safe alternative in the preparation of food products in allergic persons.

  • Pears have been suggested in various traditional medicines in the treatment of colitis, chronic gallbladder disorders, arthritis, and gout.


Types of Pears
  

  • Bartlett: best known of the pear varieties in the U.S., and most often the variety found in cans. Bartlett’s are yellow/green and speckled, and sometimes called Williams pears.
  • Bosc: cinnamon brown-skinned pears with long tapered necks with a honey-like but complex flavor.
  • Comice: round, short pears with either green and red coloring, or sometimes almost completely red with especially soft and juicy flesh.
  • Concorde: tall, skinny, and golden/green pears with flesh that is firmer and more dense than many other varieties.
  • Forelle: red/green and speckled like a trout, and thus the name, meaning "trout" in German. A small-sized pear that yellows as it ripens.
  • Green Anjou: a widely available, compact, and short-necked pear. It doesn't change color much while ripening, so you'll need to use the stem test described in our How to Select and Store section.
  • Red Anjou: very much like its green counterpart, except a rich reddish maroon in color and higher in anthocyanins (which is the main reason for its rich red color).
  • Red Bartlett: very much like its yellow/green counterpart, except with an all-round bright red skin, they sometimes feature light vertical striping, and like Red Anjou, they are rich in anthocyanins.
  • Seckel: smallest of the commonly eaten pears, usually yellow/green or olive green in color, and mixed with broad patches of red.



GOOD SELLING!! 

 

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Training new personnel takes time and resources. Keeping experienced staff up-to-date on new produce trends requires time and resources too.

Training new personnel takes time and resources. Keeping experienced staff up-to-date on new produce trends requires time and resources too.

Training new personnel takes time and resources. Keeping experienced staff up-to-date on new produce trends requires time and resources too.


 
 
 
 
 



            

 
 
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